If you previously were removed from the United States or are otherwise inadmissible, something that you may be able to do is to ask about receiving a Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility. When you do this, you will need to provide a lot of information. That’s why it’s a smart idea to have your attorney help you work through the documents and be sure that you’re submitting everything that is needed.

Some of the items that you will need to provide to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services include:

  • Evidence to support a case of extreme hardship
  • Evidence that establishes why you should qualify for a waiver of inadmissibility
  • Evidence that a denial of admission would result in extreme hardship to yourself or your qualifying relatives
  • Support for your request for a waiver due to alien smuggling
  • Evidence to support the waiver of a three- or 10-year bar that falls under the requirements of INA section 212(a)(9)(B)(v)
  • And many others.

As you can tell from just this short list, there are many intensive documents that need to be provided to help prove that you should receive a waiver and that your presence in the United States is going to be beneficial to yourself, your family and the country.

Can you ask to have fees waived when you seek a waiver of the grounds of inadmissibility?

The U.S. knows that some people have trouble paying for this application, so fee waiver requests are accepted from some individuals, such as those applying for Temporary Protected Status or VAWA self-petitioners. If you’re concerned about the fees, your attorney can help you learn more about seeking a fee waiver, too.