There’s a special visa for some victims of domestic violence

| Jun 5, 2020 | Immigration |

When you enter the United States through a family visa as a spouse or child of a citizen or lawful permanent resident, you may feel like your presence in the country depends on the other person involved. The same is true for those who enter the country through a fiance visa and then marry the person who sponsored their visa.

You may feel as though you have no rights if your parent or partner engages in domestic abuse against you. However, victims of violence committed in this country by a U.S. citizen may be able to qualify for a special visa, especially if they cooperate in the prosecution of the offender.

The U visa specifically protects victims of crimes

There are many different visas and many scenarios that can justify someone wanting to seek entrance into the U.S. The U visa is a special visa program that is only available to victims of specific  crimes. There is a range of offenses that qualify someone for a U visa, including rape, abduction, domestic violence, trafficking, stalking, incest and female genital mutilation.

It can be very unnerving to take a stand against someone who is engaged in violence against you, especially if that person is the reason you were able to enter the U.S. However, with the right support and documentation, you may be able to sever your relationship with a domestic abuser while still maintaining your lawful residence in the country. In fact, you may even be able to apply for a Green Card after you secure a U-visa, meaning you could stay in the U.S. permanently.